Northern Territory

Meet Team

Northern Territory

Co-Chairs
​Dr Nadi Pandithage
​Dr Warren Adie
​Dr Nicolas Forget
​Dr Claire Gorham

Committee Members
​Dr Jamie Moran

DR JAMIE MORAN

Our Regional Co-Chair drive and oversee EMUGs activity in their region in collaboration with the Operations Team.

Co-Chairs

Committee

The hands on driving force that achieve EMUGs mission in their region.

DR NADI PANDITHAGE

BMBS (Hons), FACEM, CCPU

​​Why I'm LOCUS for POCUS

I studied medicine at a time when POCUS didn't exist. POCUS started to appear only after I became FACEM and like many others I attended the various POCUS courses with enthusiasm and came out inspired. Unfortunately, the courses I attended did not highlight that this was only the first baby step of a much longer journey to using POCUS in your clinical assessments. When I came back to work I realised that despite all the amazing learning at these courses, I really was not comfortable to put a probe on a patient and come to a conclusion that would affect my patient assessments; so POCUS stopped there for me. As the (many) years passed, my trainees were starting to ask about use of POCUS and wanted assistance with their POCUS skills. I was not able to assist them and eventually the more confident trainees started to teach me. It was at that time I decided as a senior FACEM, POCUS was a crater of knowledge, and more importantly skill, that I lacked and needed to fill. I had some sabbatical time available and decided to use this to complete a CCPU. This step resulted in me completing all 14 of the emergency related CCPUs but realising at the end of all this that really this was only just the first few steps of POCUS. POCUS has dramatically changed my clinical practice and ability to support my trainees in this evolving area. EMUGs has been an amazing inspiration to support me in this process especially when dealing with the dinosaurs in emergency medicine who refuse to accept the value of POCUS even when it is a key part of trainee curriculum now. I love the opportunity that EMUGs have given me to meet POCUS enthusiasts, inspire my thirst for POCUS even more and pick me up when disheartened by the walls put up around my clinical work areas. My POCUS learning continues on a daily basis as I add more and more layers to what I have already learnt.

Training & Education
Attended School and High School in Darwin, NT. Studied medicine Flinders Uni, South Australia


Why EMUGs?
I received an email inviting anyone interested in POCUS to join other enthusiasts and that was all that it took!

 

When I grow up...
mmm tough question but definitely the 5yr old me wanted to be rescued from my boring ordinary life and discovered to be the long lost beloved princess of some amazing place!

Bucket List
Grow an orchard full of every tropical fruit and veg around the world

eyes and a great go to font for titles, paragraphs & more.

Training & Education
Attended School and High School in Darwin, NT. Studied medicine Flinders Uni, South Australia


Why EMUGs?
I received an email inviting anyone interested in POCUS to join other enthusiasts and that was all that it took!

 

When I grow up...
mmm tough question but definitely the 5yr old me wanted to be rescued from my boring ordinary life and discovered to be the long lost beloved princess of some amazing place!

Bucket List
Grow an orchard full of every tropical fruit and veg around the world

eyes and a great go to font for titles, paragraphs & more.

DR NADI PANDITHAGE

BMBS (Hons), FACEM, CCPU

Why I'm LOCUS for POCUSI studied medicine at a time when POCUS didn't exist. POCUS started to appear only after I became FACEM and like many others I attended the various POCUS courses with enthusiasm and came out inspired. Unfortunately, the courses I attended did not highlight that this was only the first baby step of a much longer journey to using POCUS in your clinical assessments. When I came back to work I realised that despite all the amazing learning at these courses, I really was not comfortable to put a probe on a patient and come to a conclusion that would affect my patient assessments; so POCUS stopped there for me. As the (many) years passed, my trainees were starting to ask about use of POCUS and wanted assistance with their POCUS skills. I was not able to assist them and eventually the more confident trainees started to teach me. It was at that time I decided as a senior FACEM, POCUS was a crater of knowledge, and more importantly skill, that I lacked and needed to fill. I had some sabbatical time available and decided to use this to complete a CCPU. This step resulted in me completing all 14 of the emergency related CCPUs but realising at the end of all this that really this was only just the first few steps of POCUS. POCUS has dramatically changed my clinical practice and ability to support my trainees in this evolving area. EMUGs has been an amazing inspiration to support me in this process especially when dealing with the dinosaurs in emergency medicine who refuse to accept the value of POCUS even when it is a key part of trainee curriculum now. I love the opportunity that EMUGs have given me to meet POCUS enthusiasts, inspire my thirst for POCUS even more and pick me up when disheartened by the walls put up around my clinical work areas. My POCUS learning continues on a daily basis as I add more and more layers to what I have already learnt.

DR WARREN ADIE

MBBS, PCCU, FACEM


​​Why I'm LOCUS for POCUS

Having worked in regional hospitals for many years with limited on call radiology, I began using ultrasound pre and post reduction of Colle's fractures and forearm fractures in the paediatric population prior to post reduction XRAY and found it significantly reduced the need for repeat reduction post XRAY, vastly improved patient and parent satisfaction amongst the paediatric population, and often negated the need to call in a radiographer overnight. It also was handy in confirmation post reduction of shoulder dislocation treatment.
After acquiring EFAST and ECHO skills, I replaced the stethoscope with POCUS and found it improved my diagnostic skills and resultant patient management at the bedside. 
4 cases in particular standout. The 1st was a case of a male patient presenting short of breath and cyanotic, oxygen saturations of 70% and wearing a moonboot to a small regional hospital with no Emergency Physician cover - I was a locum SMO. Whilst nurses drew up thrombolysis for treatment of massive PE I performed bedside ECHO that showed a hyperdynamic heart with RV:LV ratio of <0.5. I continued on with EFAST which showed a large ruptured AAA with multi-layered clot. As a result we withheld thrombolysis!
The 2nd case was a code blue patient at a large tertiary centre transferred from the inpatient psychiatric unit intubated and ventilated post witnessed collapse with no preceding symptoms. As patient was whisked off to get a CTB +/- stroke protocol ?SAH I noted the patient to be saturating 92% on FiO2 of 1.0. I was not manging the patient at the time however managed to convince the treating doctor to delay transfer to perform a bedside ECHO. As a result a CTPA was added to the stroke protocol. Scan initially denied by radiology however on review of my LAX view showing a large RV with a plethoric IVC CTPA approved which revealed a massive PE.
The 3rd case was again in a small regional hospital. A patient was being admitted to the ward with pneumonia. I noticed a large A-a gradient (saturations in low 90s on NRBM) and asked the treating doctor if I could perform a bedside ECHO prior to ward admission. This ended up being a life saving scan with ECHO revealling a 11cm clot in transit through the pulmonary valve. She recieved heparinisation for days (due to brain mets newly diagnosed on my CTB that you of course do for every massive PE patient yeah) and on 3 month followup had a full return to baseline functional capacity. 
The 4th case was a gentleman who presented to a large tertiary hospital presyncopal with coldness to his chest, no chest pain. Initial troponins and ECG negative and planned admission under cardiology. As I walked by I noted his sallow colour. My bedside ECHO revealed a mildly dilated aortic root which was dismissed by the cardiology registrar. A CT aortogram (that I ordered despite his cardiology bedcard admission) revealed a type A dissection extending to below the diaphragm. Cardiothoracics took the patient to theatre within 2 hours.

Training & Education

Began life as an Engineer, the naturopath and record store owner. 
Graduated from the University of Western Australia school of medicine.
Travelled Australia training in over 30 hospitals across Australia.
ACEM Fellow. Postgraduate Certificate in Clinical Ultrasound.


Why EMUGs?

The idea of meeting other like-minded people who actively used ultrasound in their daily practice was too good to pass up! And there definitely has been no regrets! 
Also, I'm a nerd at heart and just hope that the tricorder will be the next evolution in bedside diagnostication. Being actively involved in EMUGS has allowed me to meet others with similar dreams (well at least one).

When I grow up...
Medicine was definitely not on the cards for me initially. After leaving a career in engineering I had plans on becoming a chef and opening my own restaraunt. Working in the industry really shatter these dreams. So I grew my hair long, wore 100% cotton fisherman pants and began drinking Kombucha (prior to all the fancy flavoured offerings - it tasted like dirt and that was cool man!) and joined naturopathy. Apparently I asked too many scientific questions and was encouraged to join med school. During this time I opened a record store and almost gave up medicine for a career as a professional groupie and party liaison. Somethings haven't changed!​

Bucket List

Definately sky diving. Doing a backflip into a pool. Performing a tripod headstand and transitioning into into lotus legs. Oh and acquiring a six pack - the one that results from abstinence of beer.

Training & Education

Began life as an Engineer, the naturopath and record store owner. 
Graduated from the University of Western Australia school of medicine.
Travelled Australia training in over 30 hospitals across Australia.
ACEM Fellow. Postgraduate Certificate in Clinical Ultrasound.


Why EMUGs?

The idea of meeting other like-minded people who actively used ultrasound in their daily practice was too good to pass up! And there definitely has been no regrets! 
Also, I'm a nerd at heart and just hope that the tricorder will be the next evolution in bedside diagnostication. Being actively involved in EMUGS has allowed me to meet others with similar dreams (well at least one).

When I grow up...
Medicine was definitely not on the cards for me initially. After leaving a career in engineering I had plans on becoming a chef and opening my own restaraunt. Working in the industry really shatter these dreams. So I grew my hair long, wore 100% cotton fisherman pants and began drinking Kombucha (prior to all the fancy flavoured offerings - it tasted like dirt and that was cool man!) and joined naturopathy. Apparently I asked too many scientific questions and was encouraged to join med school. During this time I opened a record store and almost gave up medicine for a career as a professional groupie and party liaison. Somethings haven't changed!​

Bucket List

Definately sky diving. Doing a backflip into a pool. Performing a tripod headstand and transitioning into into lotus legs. Oh and acquiring a six pack - the one that results from abstinence of beer.

DR WARREN ADIE

MBBS, PCCU, FACEM


​​Why I'm LOCUS for POCUS

Having worked in regional hospitals for many years with limited on call radiology, I began using ultrasound pre and post reduction of Colle's fractures and forearm fractures in the paediatric population prior to post reduction XRAY and found it significantly reduced the need for repeat reduction post XRAY, vastly improved patient and parent satisfaction amongst the paediatric population, and often negated the need to call in a radiographer overnight. It also was handy in confirmation post reduction of shoulder dislocation treatment.
After acquiring EFAST and ECHO skills, I replaced the stethoscope with POCUS and found it improved my diagnostic skills and resultant patient management at the bedside. 
4 cases in particular standout. The 1st was a case of a male patient presenting short of breath and cyanotic, oxygen saturations of 70% and wearing a moonboot to a small regional hospital with no Emergency Physician cover - I was a locum SMO. Whilst nurses drew up thrombolysis for treatment of massive PE I performed bedside ECHO that showed a hyperdynamic heart with RV:LV ratio of <0.5. I continued on with EFAST which showed a large ruptured AAA with multi-layered clot. As a result we withheld thrombolysis!
The 2nd case was a code blue patient at a large tertiary centre transferred from the inpatient psychiatric unit intubated and ventilated post witnessed collapse with no preceding symptoms. As patient was whisked off to get a CTB +/- stroke protocol ?SAH I noted the patient to be saturating 92% on FiO2 of 1.0. I was not manging the patient at the time however managed to convince the treating doctor to delay transfer to perform a bedside ECHO. As a result a CTPA was added to the stroke protocol. Scan initially denied by radiology however on review of my LAX view showing a large RV with a plethoric IVC CTPA approved which revealed a massive PE.
The 3rd case was again in a small regional hospital. A patient was being admitted to the ward with pneumonia. I noticed a large A-a gradient (saturations in low 90s on NRBM) and asked the treating doctor if I could perform a bedside ECHO prior to ward admission. This ended up being a life saving scan with ECHO revealling a 11cm clot in transit through the pulmonary valve. She recieved heparinisation for days (due to brain mets newly diagnosed on my CTB that you of course do for every massive PE patient yeah) and on 3 month followup had a full return to baseline functional capacity. 
The 4th case was a gentleman who presented to a large tertiary hospital presyncopal with coldness to his chest, no chest pain. Initial troponins and ECG negative and planned admission under cardiology. As I walked by I noted his sallow colour. My bedside ECHO revealed a mildly dilated aortic root which was dismissed by the cardiology registrar. A CT aortogram (that I ordered despite his cardiology bedcard admission) revealed a type A dissection extending to below the diaphragm. Cardiothoracics took the patient to theatre within 2 hours.

DR NICOLAS FORGET

MD, MPH, DTMH, FACEM


​​Why I'm LOCUS for POCUS

To clinch that "Mic drop" diagnosis, of course! Well more "Probe drop" but actually gently placing the probe back on the machine after fully wiping it down and recording images for correct documentation.

Training & Education

Long fun journey... Undergrad at McGill in Montreal (Canada), Med school at the University of Maryland in Baltimore (USA), Internship in New Haven (USA), Emergency Medicine at Los Angeles County + USC hospital in Los Angeles, California (USA), DTMH in Lima, Peru...


Why EMUGs?

Supportive community to develop US in the NT

When I grow up...

Astronaut. Pilot.

Bucket List

Fly into space to see the earth from above.

Training & Education

Long fun journey... Undergrad at McGill in Montreal (Canada), Med school at the University of Maryland in Baltimore (USA), Internship in New Haven (USA), Emergency Medicine at Los Angeles County + USC hospital in Los Angeles, California (USA), DTMH in Lima, Peru...


Why EMUGs?

Supportive community to develop US in the NT

When I grow up...

Astronaut. Pilot.

Bucket List

Fly into space to see the earth from above.

DR NICOLAS FORGET

MD, MPH, DTMH, FACEM


​​Why I'm LOCUS for POCUS

To clinch that "Mic drop" diagnosis, of course! Well more "Probe drop" but actually gently placing the probe back on the machine after fully wiping it down and recording images for correct documentation.

DR CLAIRE GORHAM

MBBS

Why I'm LOCUS for POCUS

I love the difference you can make to the anxious women/parents with early pregnancy pain or bleeding. I’ve been scanning since I was PGY3. My ultrasound hero’s are Nadi Pandithage and Shailesh Dass.​​

Training & Education

CCPU at Redcliffe Hospital, and 2 months shy of FACEM


Why EMUGs?

The desire to foster an interest in US in our region

When I grow up...

An Olympian - in swimming or waterpolo

Bucket List

I would love to do The Katherine Ultra solo, but I have to learn how to run in the NT heat first

Training & Education

CCPU at Redcliffe Hospital, and 2 months shy of FACEM


Why EMUGs?

The desire to foster an interest in US in our region

When I grow up...

An Olympian - in swimming or waterpolo

Bucket List

I would love to do The Katherine Ultra solo, but I have to learn how to run in the NT heat first

DR CLAIRE GORHAM

MBBS

Why I'm LOCUS for POCUS

I love the difference you can make to the anxious women/parents with early pregnancy pain or bleeding. I’ve been scanning since I was PGY3. My ultrasound hero’s are Nadi Pandithage and Shailesh Dass.​​